Browsing Posts in Travel music

Italy travel Carrara

Sometimes editor types joke about the “three I’s of travel” that grace so many magazine covers: Italy, Ireland, and India. They’re photogenic, look exotic, and have nice luxury hotels with ad money to spend. You’ll rarely find a travel magazine that goes a whole 12 months without one of the three on a cover.

In the current issue of Perceptive Travel, we subbed in Iceland for Ireland. (Don’t worry, you can still find the latter plenty of places on our blog.) Iceland is also photogenic, can look exotic, and has some nice hotels. As usual though, we don’t tick off places you’ve already seen a hundred times before. We like to take the road less traveled. In this case we’re literally on the road with Luke Armstrong as he tries to learn how to drive a stick shift on the fly. In a van. Going across Iceland in the “crazy season.” See Learning to Drive a Dinosaur in Iceland.

We also have a story about Italy, but toss out your expectations because Debi Goodwin is not going to check anything off your bucket list. This place was on hers though: the Italian marble quarries of Carrara.

Old Delhi

We had a story in the past on how the “Incredible India” portrayed in ads and glossy travel stories is like an alternate universe to the Slumdog Millionaire reality that non-luxury travelers see every day. Being sheltered from the grinding poverty is next to impossible if you go for a walk though, as Jim Johnston finds out in Hunger and Privilege: Dinner in Old Delhi.

As always we run down some world music worth listening to, from a globalFEST compilation to classical music with a Turkish twinge, through the ears of Laurence Mitchell.

Susan Griffith reviews three new travel books: one from a legend, one from a shipping industry reporter, and one from…well, you decide.

Need some new travel shoes?

We give away something cool to one of our loyal Perceptive Travel readers each month and last time Jack P. from Florida scored a nice $139 daypack from Granite Gear. In April we’re setting someone from the USA up with a nice $90 pair summer travel shoes: the H2O Escape Bungee Sneaker from Sperry Topsiders.

To win, you could follow PT on Facebook and pay close attention. The better bet is to sign up for the monthly e-mail newsletter.

amazon-top2

I think I can say with confidence that if an executive editor of Travel + Leisure or Afar tried to put this month’s batch of Perceptive Travel stories on the cover of their magazine, said editor would soon be looking for a new job.

We don’t like to play it safe though, so we’re going with our odd batch of travel tales from places that won’t make the trend-chasing travelers sit up and take notice.

Well, we do have Brazil in there, which is getting tons of press in 2014, but there will not be any World Cup matches where this article takes place. Volker Poelzl and his girlfriend take off on a canoe to paddle down a remote section of the Amazon River where there are more pink dolphins and caimans than people. See The River of Solitude in Brazil.

Ukraine travelJudith Fein corresponds with a pen pal in Ukraine for 20 years before finally paying him a visit. She’s there to research a new book (The Spoon From Minkovitz) and dive into the origins of her mother’s home cooking in Jewish Brooklyn back in the day. See Kishka and Kasha in the Ukranian Countryside.

I think I know a lot about the world and as a kid I was fairly obsessed with all the unsolved mystery stuff that was all the rage in the 70s—from UFOs to the Loch Ness Monster. I’ve never heard of this strange Nan Madol site in Micronesia though that Brad Olsen profiles. It’s a citadel of ancient kings, built with giant basalt “logs” that can weigh a couple hundred tons, and it defies all logical explanation as to why it’s there and how it was built. See Micronesia’s Mysterious Nan Madol.

Graham Reid cranks up some new world music albums, including the new Rough Guides collection Arabic Cafe and a new one from the legendary Gipsy Kings.

Bill Caverlee reviews some new and noteworthy travel books hitting the shelves, from yet another Lonely Planet coffee table book to the 80th anniversary edition of a beloved Footprint guide. See the latest travel book reviews.

Granite Gear packWe give away something cool for free each month to one of our newsletter subscribers. For February, an Australian reader named Hannah scored a free pair of new Vasque shoes. This time we’ve got a $130 daypack from Granite Gear that can work for hiking or just hauling around your stuff when you’re sightseeing. You’re on the newsletter list, right? If not, get on it quick to enter this month and every month.

I’ve saved the bragging for last, but if you’ve read this far, we’ve done very well in some award announcements lately. Perceptive Travel got a Silver for “best online travel magazine” from the North American Travel Journalists Association, as well as some individual awards. Then the Solas Awards came out and we took home even more in that one. See the home page of Perceptive Travel for more: best travel writing awards.

arctic hiking story

After a hiatus publishing our first most popular travel stories issue, we’re back with a batch of new travel stories from Panama, western China, and Arctic Canada. Plus reviews of new travel books and world music.

This issue marks the debut of Canadian writer Jerry Kobalenko, a many who thinks its fun to hike across snow-blown plains in sub-zero weather with an expedition partner he just recently met. See his story here: Crossing Labrador by Foot with Noah.

western China travelLuke Armstrong is back with a tale of getting roped into hiking Panama’s highest mountain at sunrise and seeing a killer with a knife at the top. Then having no ride when he got to the bottom. See The Horror Movie Atop Panama’s Volcán Barú

Can travelers make a positive difference in the local cultural attitudes? James Dorsey and his traveling partner find a way to do their small part with one ancient vendor in an Ughur area of China. See Giving Face in China.

Susan Griffith is back with a batch of interesting new travel books, including the latest on Africa from Paul Theroux. Laurence Mitchell reviews new world music albums that are all a mash-up of one culture and another.

Perceptive Travel newsletter subscribers get a shot every month at scoring a new travel gear item. Last month reader Kim from Pennsylvania won a cool Bluetooth portable speaker from NYNE. This time someone will get a pair of great $130 shoes from Vasque that are so new they’re not even out yet. Here’s where you can get on the list. You’ll get an e-mail only once a month when we put out a new issue.

It’s time for another collection of the best travel stories from wandering book authors. This month’s issue of Perceptive Travel (just crowned with another “best travel writing” award), journeys to Japan, the Maldives, and the Peruvian Amazon.

We’re happy to have Edward Readicker-Henderson back, spinning a tale that’s strange even by our off-kilter standards, looking back through a warped lens on his time teaching English in Japan. See Osaka in the End.

Michael Buckley has swam with whale sharks and gone paragliding with hawks in Nepal. This time he goes Freediving with Manta Rays. At the top is a video he shot with a GoPro.

James Dorsey has visited all kinds of people who find ways to connect to the world beyond ours. This time he visits a remote village in the Amazon jungle to find the female Shaman of San Regis.

As usual we run down some interesting new travel books you might want to put on your wish list (via William Caverlee) and some notable new world music albums you might find intriguing (via Graham Reid).

Tifosi travel sunglasses

Our regular readers always have a chance to win some cool travel gear and last month a reader from Ohio took home a Goal Zero Guide 10 solar charging kit that folds up and packs easily. This month we’re giving away some sporty sunglasses from Tifosi Optics. If you’re on the newsletter list, check your bulk folder if you didn’t see the message. If not, go follow us on Facebook and you’ll see the contest announcement with how to enter.

Get in on the action next time around by hitting that newsletter sign-up button on the right side of the home page.

 

diving Timor

The summer is coming to an unofficial end and it’s time for the September 2013 issue of Perceptive Travel. As usual we’ve got some of the best travel stories from book authors on the move. This month coming to you from three continents, specifically from Ethiopia, Timor-Leste, and a huge nature preserve on the New Mexico/Colorado border.

Ethiopia travelThis may be the most unusual travel story you’ll read this month: James Dorsey’s tale of being pinched, kicked, and punched to get photos of the Mursi tribespeople of Ethiopia—while also being hit up for hard currency. Mercy Mursi!

Michael Buckley previously brought us a story on diving with whale sharks in the Philippines. This time he ventures further south to go diving in Timor-Leste, where everyone asks him what charity he works for and his dives are all missing something: big fish.

Judith Fein had a serious distrust of nature when leaving her home in the city, but Ted Turner changed her mind. Well, his 593.000 acre Vermejo Park Ranch did anyway.

As always we run down some interesting new travel books worth reading or at least knowing about and we’ve got four world music albums that might catch your interest.

If you’re a regular reader, you could score some free travel gear like Jane of Missouri did last month. She’ll be getting a package of Pickpocket-Proof clothing. Will you be next? This time we’re giving away two packages of two items. Two people who get our monthly e-mail newsletter or follow Perceptive Travel on Facebook will score both of them. There’s an Adidas travel wicking shirt and a Luci solar lantern going out in a month. See the home page of Perceptive travel for photos and links.