Browsing Posts in Travel books

I’ve been dropping hints and links for a while now about my next book, asking you to get on the Cheap Living Abroad newsletter list if you wanted to cut your expenses in half just by changing your address. But now I’m less than a month away from release date.

Better life moving abroadI’m officially announcing the “friends and followers” launch date of August 13, a few days before the packages go on sale (at a higher price) for the general public.

The book cover is above, voted on by the newsletter readers as the one they liked best. Here’s the full title and subtitle:

A Better Life for Half the Price: How to prosper on less money in the cheapest places to live.

This will be in e-book form now, in paperback come December. This is not some wimpy short e-book that makes you go, “I paid how much for that?” When it comes out in print it will be some 260 pages long, packed with great general info on moving to another country to cut your expenses in half, as well as specific recommendations where the cost of living is low and the place is foreigner-friendly enough for you to set up residency there. You’ll hear stories and real prices from people already living the dream of a better life for far less money. Even if you skip half of it, the book should save you tens of thousands of dollars.

If you’re just curious and want the book alone, that’s fine.

If you’re beyond the dreaming stage and are starting to put the wheels in motion, the second tier package (“Committed) will have a private Facebook group, webinar replays, a batch of extra reports, and an insiders newsletter.

The top package (“All In”) will include all that plus live webinars, tailored interviews, conference calls, and personal coaching.

I’ll have package details and prices posted a week before the launch.

If you’re not on the notification list yet, go find out more here. Otherwise, watch this countdown clock and join me August 13!

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Taiwan travel story

(c) Rich J. Matheson

With that title you probably know…it’s time for a new collection of the best travel stories on the web. The July issue of Perceptive Travel is out now and we go wandering in pursuit of some strange angles.

Luke Armstrong is back with another tale from his adopted home of Guatemala, following a naturalist with exploration in his blood who is looking for a rare butterfly first discovered by his great-grandfather.

Guatemala travel story

Steven Crook, author of several books on Taiwan, takes us deep into Blood Rites in a Taiwanese Temple.

Carolyn Heller returns this month, fresh off her award from the Travel Media Association of Canada for a previous story on northern Ontario. This time she looks at isolation of a different kind while encountering a North Korea soldier on the border with China. See One Step Across.

William Caverlee checks out a few soul-searching travel books from Frances Mayes, Donna Leon, and Esther Woolfson. Graham Reid covers new world music albums from around the globe, including a great collection of Indian classical music and the return of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars.

STM laptop bag for travelWe give away something cool each month to a Perceptive Travel subscriber/follower who is paying attention and last month two readers scored. They each got gift certificates to go shopping at the Samsonite USA website for a new suitcase or a daypack. Speaking of something to take on your next trip, this time one lucky reader will get this nice $140 value Drifter Pack from STM Bags. I’ve been using one of these myself lately and it has become my go-to daypack when I need to travel with my laptop and have loads of pockets for other gadgets.

If you’re already on our newsletter list, then just watch your inbox and check the bulk folder if the address is not in your approved list. If not and you want to get in on this month’s, just go follow Perceptive Travel on Facebook and watch for the announcements that will run a few times in July.

 

There’s a lot of chatter in the publishing industry right now about how independent, self-published authors are totally kicking butt and realizing that they can do a lot better on their own than they ever could have done with a traditional publisher. Part of this is because they don’t put all their efforts into a first-week launch and then move on to the next thing. Most of their sales come well after that because they’re still visible and as many have said, “A book is always new if you’ve never read it.”

So in that spirit, many of these books are not brand new and are not stacked by the dozens at the front of Barnes & Noble, but they’re as great as when they first came out. The last one two are new though, if you want to get something hot off the press.

Last Days of the Incas

Inca empire PeruI put off reading this 2007 release for a long time because it’s a really thick, heavy book and I thought it would be a tough slog. I was oh so wrong about that. Last Days of the Incas has all the pacing and character development of an epic novel. It just happens to all be true. Meticulously researched but written by someone who is great at telling a story, this is one of those tales that would seem completely unbelievable if someone made it up.

It’s the story of how a motley band of 168 greedy, low-class Spaniards managed to rout an entire Inca empire that stretched 2,500 miles from northern Ecuador down to the bottom of Peru. Solely because they had horses and steel weapons, they were able to hold off an army of more than 10,000 rebels that tried to take back Cusco. Full of strategic blunders, fateful egos, and double-crossing, it’s the greatest movie you’ve never seen. Here’s an interview with author Kim MacQuarrie if you want to learn more.

Going Clear

While at a resort in Zihuatanejo, I found this on a book exchange shelf and figured I’d educate myself about the wacky cult based in my sometime home of Tampa Bay. Going Clear was even wackier than I expected. It starts with L. Ron Hubbard’s self-embellished, odd life history, then the growth of his “religion,” to the secretive, exploitative compounds and control mechanisms the organization now uses to keep everyone locked in and financially feeding the beast. There have been a few brave books like this by authors who soon get harassed and sued over and over again afterwards, but this one benefits from interviews and stories from very high-ranking officers who left the organization, despite the great personal risk and isolation that entails. This book is fascinating in the same way as a Stephen King book—a terrible horror story you’re glad you can view from a safe distance.

Getting Out & The Expat Guidebook

Moving abroad bookI’ve finishing up my latest book, A Better Life for Half the Price, about cutting your expenses in half by moving to a cheaper place to live. (Get on the notification list here.) To make sure I haven’t missed anything fundamental, I’ve been getting a gut check by reading two in-depth guides to moving abroad. Getting Out makes the case for moving away just to, well, get out. So it’s not focused on costs so much as a better quality of life. And better health care–which you get almost anywhere else you would move to from the USA.

The Expat Guidebook starts out as a diatribe, then offers a solution, then gives you all the answers to the nitty-gritty questions you’ll pose to make a transformation happen. The overall premise is that you can live much better abroad by escaping the consumer-driven rat race. By following author T.W. Anderson’s 568 pages of tips gleaned from living in two countries, you’ll be prepared for whatever the world throws at you.

Travels with Baby

I reviewed the first edition of Shelly Rivoli’s excellent book on traveling with babies, toddlers, and pre-schoolers when it came out. My daughter, who once fit that profile, is now 13, so I’ve just been skimming through this to see how the new one looks. Susan Griffith has a detailed review of it in this month’s issue of Perceptive Travel though, so you can see more there. From what I have seen though, Travels with Baby is the most thorough, comprehensive book out there on the subject and it goes well beyond the little Ziploc bag tricks and Disney ticket advice things you see in most mommy blogger titles. Shelly’s a real travel writer who is out and about with her family more than most and she strikes a good balance between urging you to explore and staying safe and healthy along the way. Good solid advice if you’re a parent wanting to travel with little ones.

The Rules of Travel

Hobotraveler rules of travelI put this little pocket book last because I could be accused of being a little biased: I wrote the forward to it. The Rules of Travel is from my long-time buddy Andy Graham, the Hobo Traveler. If you’ve read the budget travel in Africa guest post he did for me earlier, you know he’s an opinionated guy who doesn’t believe in acting politically correct to keep from pissing people off. Whether you agree with every one of his rules or not, you’re sure to spend a lot less and be a lot safer when you travel if you follow even half of them. I don’t know anyone who has been on the road for a longer continuous period than Andy. Sure, that makes you a bit cynical after a while, but it also makes you wise.

This is not a book you’re going to curl up with in the hammock to keep you entertained for hours. It’s something to pick up, digest a chapter of, and then come back to later. When you’re finished, you’ll be more savvy than 95% of your follow backpackers out there circling the globe.

writer

I’ve got my head down trying to finish up a book called A Better Life for Half the Price, about drastically cutting your expenses about moving abroad. The problem with running your own show though, being an entrepreneur, is that you don’t just clock out at 5:30 and say goodbye to The Man. I am The Man. And I’m a really demanding boss.

So to take a break from coming up with all new material this week, here’s some stuff I’ve published lately and some interviews.

Here’s an interview of me that ran on the blog The Gift of Travel, talking about round-the-world travel, budget travel, and living abroad with a family.

Another in The Franklin Prosperity Report is about getting the most for your travel budget every time.

Here’s one in SmartyCents on how to travel on a budget as a family.

Nora Dunn gave a shout-out to my Travel Writing 2.0 book in this great article about how to earn a living while living abroad.

Machu Picchu

At Global Traveler Magazine, in April I had a feature story about Machu Picchu and in May one about what to do if you have a week in Nicaragua. The latter is still on newsstands, but click the link for the online version.

On Practical Travel Gear, I’ve been writing about travel tripods, carry-on insect repellents, and two under-$100 daypacks from Kelty.

While I go to work, two quick plugs: if you want to travel around the world, you ought to have a copy of The World’s Cheapest Destinations book. If you want to go all in and move abroad, sign up for the Cheap Living Abroad newsletter and I’ll help you make it happen.

Drinking what's local

“Yes yes, that’s all good advice,” she said, “but my editor really wants to focus on what’s new. What are people doing now to save money that they couldn’t have done a year or two ago? New social websites, apps, that sort of thing.”

This was from an interview I did with an ambitious young associate editor sitting in a desk in NYC who writes for a well-known women’s magazine. It happened a year ago, but I’ve had the same conversation four or five times since. Most publications want to appear as if they have their finger on the pulse, that they know everything months before you do and are bringing you the hottest tips, the latest trends. “What’s new?” is the daily mantra.

In the real world of travel though, things don’t move that fast. We can make all our travel plans online now and always find the best prices on hotels or flights, something unthinkable before the World Wide Web came along. But on a year-to-year basis, the best travel advice stays relatively tried and true. Occasionally there’s a game-changer, like Hotwire, Air BnB, Google Flights, or Trivago that can save you money. Others like Uber or TripIt can make your trip go more smoothly. But most new travel tech innovations are solving something they think is more of a problem than it really is.

In that spirit, here are some old articles from this blog—some very old—that could be run today with just a few pricing tweaks. Do these things and you’ll come out ahead, even if you drop your smartphone in a river and can’t get online for a week.

Find the Screaming Bargains – Every destination has a few items or services that are a better deal there than elsewhere. Find them, use them, consume them.

eat what's local

Slow Travel is Cheaper Travel – Related to the above post somewhat, eating and drinking what’s local is usually a smart move for your budget. And the more you’re moving around, the higher your daily budget needs to be. Help Mother Nature and your wallet at the same time: slow down! If you stay in one place for a month or more, your costs will really plummet. If you’re on a tight budget, it’s all about location, velocity, and distance.

Exchange Rates Matter a Lot – I’ve written about this at least once a year (like here, and more recently here) because if your  home currency rises or falls 25% against the one where you’re going, that’s going to greatly impact your costs, far more than where you’re going to eat lunch.

Where You Go Within a Country Matters a Lot Too – The price difference between big capital cities and small towns applies nearly everywhere in the world. Also, tourist magnets that draw short-term vacationers are always going to be a bad bet for backpackers. Don’t automatically head to the places you’ve heard of when you get to France, Spain, India, or Ecuador. Chances are there are better spots to hang out in for less money. Keep your options open.

Rural travel

Last, remember that just because you can now plan and set up everything in advance, it doesn’t mean you should. A person standing at the hotel front desk at 6 pm with money in their hand has negotiating power. A person booking on a website has zero negotiating power unless they’re bidding on Priceline. And besides, a lot of the best things happen when you allow time for interesting things to happen. The more your plans are tightly scheduled, the tougher that can be.

If you haven’t traveled much yet or have some clueless friends you’d like to enlighten, pick up a copy of my timeless book Make Your Travel Dollars Worth a Fortune. It’s full of key principles to follow in order to always find the best deal every time, regardless of what shiny new app the magazine editors are getting excited about at the moment.

Otherwise, here are another 8 great travel books for anyone setting off on a long-term trip.