Where Can You Live More Than 3 Months on a Tourist Visa?

long stay tourist visa island

Fly here, stick around four months

As I was getting close to launching the book A Better Life for Half the Price, I wanted to get interested people on an e-mail list. So I started giving away a document with a rundown on all the places you could stay for four months or more after arrival, no border runs required.

I missed a few back then and as I noted in this getting easier to live in India article, that country has gotten even more attractive from a long-term stay perspective.

As best I can tell, there are now at least 22 countries around the world where Americans can stay for more than three months, and it’s pretty close for Canadians. UK citizens have it the best if they stay in the EU because in addition to all the commonwealth countries, they can stay in any EU nation long-term as well.

You can get the updated document here if you join the other 8,000 people now on that Cheap Living Abroad newsletter list. It usually goes out monthly, very rarely more than twice in a month.

Here are a few interesting tidbits  that came out of the new research.

Cambodian food

Longest Tourist Stay Allowed for a Fee

India wins by a mile on this one, allowing Americans to get a 10-year multi-entry tourist visa with stays of 180 consecutive days allowed. You used to need to stay away for 60 days before returning, but not anymore.

In Cambodia you have to apply for a business visa, but anyone who can fog a mirror can get one and that allows you to live and work for a year, easily renewable for life (or until things change.)

Longest Cheap Living Stay Allowed for No Cost

Multiple countries allow stays for up to 180 days, but most of them are island nations like Barbados and Mauritius that are not exactly a bargain. The best “better life for half the price” options that allow you to stay this long on a visa on arrival are Mexico, Panama, and Peru. You usually have to request the 180 days at the immigration counter though, so be awake and diligent when you step up to the counter and be clear about your intentions on your immigration forms.

Guanajuato City

Where We Can All Meet up for a Year

In the country of Georgia, for people from the USA, UK, Canada and Australia there’s no visa required for a stay of 360 days

Where to Drive and Stay for Six Months

In addition to Mexico, Canadians and Americans can visit each others’ countries for 180 consecutive days. Get a T-Mobile North America plan and you can keep the same data and texts rolling even. Yea NAFTA!

If you’re British and you stay in the EU, you can take a car ferry then drive to any fellow member country and put down roots for six months. Evora Alentejo

Your Island Paradise

I was just in Fiji for my wedding anniversary and if I had decided not to come home, I could have stayed for four months. In Jamaica it’s six months for those from the U.S., UK, and Canada.

Less Love for the Yanquis

The U.S. military may be stationed in South Korea, but when it comes to visas upon arrival, Americans (and Brits) get 90 days, Canadians get 180.

 

Get the full report here: Four Months or More on a Tourist Visa

Comments
  1. Susan Korthase

    This roundup of where one can stay beyond the 120 days is really helpful. Thanks for another round of easy-to-use research, Tim.

  2. Anthony Thomas

    You can stay in Brazil for up to six months if you report to the federal police before your 90 days is up.

  3. Wade K.

    After reading your description of India in “A Better Life…” I’m wondering if it’s possible to enjoy living there? Are there certain areas where life is good, assuming you can afford them?

    • Tim Leffel

      Yes, but avoid the big polluted cities if you have no reason to be there for work purposes.

      • Wade K.

        My wife nixed that idea. We’re heading to the Balkans.

  4. Wade K.

    I think I’ve found one city in India that seems to top a lot of lists for quality of life: Chandigarh. Very affordable too. Hmmm……

    • Eric Oudin

      Chandigarh is interesting as an architectural experiment but I wouldn’t say it has a high quality of life. Perhaps compared to other Indian cities but that doesn’t say much.
      I would however consider any village on the coast in Goa, especially in the South. There you would get slightly higher prices, but also you get the beach, a greater variety of restaurants and activities that would appeal to an expat. And fantastic sunsets.

  5. gunung prau

    thanks for very comprehensive recomendations. its so different with most article we read about india which to much ” cautions”

  6. isan

    I think you can stay in Cuba like forever, but you need to find a place like a casa particular

    You need a visa but staying its not a big deal….

  7. Sanjeet Veen

    Very Good information, thanks for posting.

  8. Meg

    I just found your website today and am loving all the helpful info!! I am wondering if you or anyone has advise for the best place for an American/Israeli couple. I am American, but my fiancé is Israeli, and we are trying to find the best place where both of us can stay for at least 6 months easily. We have an online business so that should be helpful as far as proving appropriate income. Thank again for amazing articles and advice!!!

    • Tim Leffel

      I know there are some countries Israelis aren’t allowed to visit, much less live in, so it’s really going to depend on where that’s not the case. That country’s embassy will probably be the best place to start.

  9. Isiah

    What about Albania?? I hear Americans can stay in Albania for one year

    • Tim Leffel

      Everything I’ve read says tourist visas are good for a max of 90 days, much like the rest of Europe.

  10. Jefe

    Not True about Panama for Americans.

    It’s 180 days. I live here and have been coming/going since being stationed here from 87-91 in the US Army. Check the Panamanian website:

    https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/country/panama.html

    • Tim Leffel

      Jefe – I do have Panama on the document, but the 180 days upon arrival doesn’t seem to be automatic. The last two times I entered I got 30 days once and 90 days once. In theory if I had asked for more I would have gotten it, as that IS what it says in writing on the State Dept. site you posted. But some sources in Panama still say “If you only get 90 days approved upon arrival, you must renew in Panama City for another 90 days.” This is true for Mexico too in all fairness—if you don’t press it upon arrival, you won’t get the 180 days.

      I’m amending the post though to say you should get 180.

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