As we head toward the end of 2013, here’s what’s going on in some of the cheapest places to travel in the world.

Political troubles in Thailand never seem to go away for very long. The Thai prime minister just asked the monarchy to dissolve parliament after weeks of street protests in Bangkok and the whole opposition party resigning en masse to protest the legitimacy of the prime minister. Read more here, but be advised, it’s complicated…

Honduras had an election last month, but the outcome is still up in the air. Officially the ruling party candidate won, but there are plenty of fraud accusations and there have been regular protest marches. A recount is going on now to see if the 37% to 29% victory by Hernandez will hold up. If you’re traveling there, avoid the capital—which is actually a good idea anyway as its one of the most dangerous cities in Latin America.

India just had an election too and it doesn’t bode well for the ruling party for a larger one coming up in May. That might not be the best month to visit as there is a lot of anger in the streets over rising prices and poor infrastructure. This is a great time to visit overall though if you’re coming in with hard currency. Here’s how the exchange rate has gone against the US dollar since this time three years ago:

India travel

The chart looks almost identical for Nepal, where you can now get almost 100 Nepalese rupee for one US dollar. Meanwhile, the world’s oldest Buddhist shrine was discovered in Lumbini, Nepal recently and it suggests Buddha was born 300 years earlier than previously thought, about 600 years before Christ.

Egypt is still a police state, but some travelers report that the country is functioning much better than it was after the Muslim Brotherhood took over. There was some rare good news on the human rights front recently as female protestors that had received long jail sentences were released after an international outcry. Meanwhile, train service between Cairo, Luxor, and Aswan resumed last month, but the country’s deputy chief of the railways has been suspended from traveling out of the country after a crash in Giza killed 30 people.

Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria saw protests every week in November, with police clashing with students demanding political reform and an end to corruption. This is no fringe movement though: polls show more than 2/3 of the people in the country are behind them, leaving the government forces in a tricky minority.