If you want advice on the cheapest places to travel, you know that book pictured to your right is the best resource. But of course I can’t be everywhere and things are always changing, especially when it comes to prices.

So here’s what some others around the blogosphere have to say about what’s happening in The World’s Cheapest Destinations.

1 Dad 1 Kid has a great rundown on public transportation in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Like US 35 cents for an 8km city train ride!)

The Vagabonding blog has a nice rundown on the Czech Republic from someone spending a lot of time there, with photos. Like this one – you’re supposed to get a beer served like this and let it settle:

Czech beer

By Cristy Parry

As Laos has gotten very popular very fast, the inevitable has happened says Vagabonding Life: prices rise to meet the vacationers budget. For example:

“Renting a motorbike in 2006 cost me around $5. Now the price was a whopping $15. Even without a discount, you can still hire a motorbike in rich Thailand for US $5 per day; it costs only $3 in Pai.

All the usual sights and activities that were once free, no matter how small, now have ramshackle entrance booths staffed by bored people who demand money. Climbing to the top of Phou Si hill to watch a sunset, once free, now costs $3 for the 20-minute walk.”

Lake Atitlan in Guatemala was nice for Johnny Vagabond, until the hotel owner tried to fix him up with an 8-year-old girl.

Here’s a great long post from Legal Nomads on food and love in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam.

Speaking of Southeast Asia, Jaunted says Thailand’s Full Moon Party island Ko Phangan will likely be getting an airport next year.

travel during a coup

Want Luxor to yourself?

I’m not brave enough to head to Cairo right now, but a few intrepid souls are still making it to calmer Luxor, Aswan, and elsewhere. (Despite the train being shut down indefinitely.) I had trouble finding any blogger who was doing so though until I found this report on sightseeing in Egypt during a military coup. On thing’s for sure, Egypt is a “buyer’s market” in the extreme right now.

Much of the talk about India travel these days concerns the falling rupee and onion inflation. But here’s some useful advice from 10YearItch on buying and using a SIM card in India with your own phone. As is typical in India, you’ll need photocopies and forms, but it’s cheap once you get it.

Here’s a review I just put up over on the Perceptive Travel Blog about drinking in Islamic countries—including Indonesia and Egypt—with a review of the book The Wet and the Dry.

And wherever you’re going, trying to live more like a local will save you some money and give you a richer experience.